Score:   1
Docket Number:   D-MD  1:19-cr-00022
Case Name:   USA v. Johnson
  Press Releases:
Baltimore, Maryland – A federal jury convicted Sydni Frazier, a/k/a Sid, Junior Boss, and Perry, age 26, of Baltimore, Maryland late yesterday on a federal charge of conspiracy to distribute more than 100 grams of heroin, possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime resulting in death, possession with intent to distribute heroin and fentanyl, and possession of firearms by a felon.  Frazier went to trial last year with members and associates of the Murdaland Mafia Piru (MMP), a subset of the Bloods gang, but had a mistrial after his lawyer had a medical emergency.  

The conviction was announced by United States Attorney for the District of Maryland Robert K. Hur; Special Agent in Charge Timothy Jones of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) Baltimore Field Division; Commissioner Michael Harrison of the Baltimore Police Department; Chief Melissa R. Hyatt of the Baltimore County Police Department; Baltimore City State’s Attorney Marilyn J. Mosby; and Baltimore County State’s Attorney Scott Shellenberger.

United States Attorney Robert K. Hur stated, “We are committed to working with our law enforcement partners to get guns out of the hands of drug dealers and off of our streets, in order to reduce violent crime in our neighborhoods.  If you use a gun, you could face federal time, where there is no parole—ever.  Please, put down the guns and save a life—maybe even your own.”

According to the evidence presented at Frazier’s six-day trial, between at least 2014 and 2017, Frazier conspired with others, including members and associates of the MMP gang, to distribute narcotics.  For many years, MMP controlled the drug trade in large swaths of Northwest Baltimore City and neighboring Baltimore County, including Forest Park, Windsor Mill, Gwynn Oak, Howard Park, and Woodlawn.  The gang’s drug shop in the 5200 block of Windsor Mill Road was particularly lucrative due to its close proximity to Interstate 70, and it frequently attracted drug customers driving from Western Maryland and neighboring states. 

The evidence presented at trial established that on August 10, 2016, Frazier and his co-conspirators kidnapped, robbed, and murdered Ricardo Johnson in order to enrich themselves and their drug trafficking conspiracy.  The victim was abducted at approximately 2:30 am as he was returning home to his apartment in the 1100 block of West Lanvale Street in Baltimore.  Less than four hours later, the victim’s body was discovered in the back of a stolen minivan parked next to the light rail tracks in the 2200 block of Kloman Street.  Johnson had been bound by the wrists and ankles, blindfolded, and shot over twenty times.  There was partially burned flammable material sticking out of the gas tank of the van, indicating that the killers had attempted to set the van on fire before departing the scene. 

Less than twelve hours after Johnson’s body was found, members of the Baltimore Police Department (BPD) attempted to stop Frazier for riding an illegal dirt bike in the 2100 block of Tucker Lane.  Frazier fled and was able to get away, but in the process of fleeing, he abandoned the dirt bike as well as a backpack and gloves he had been wearing.  The backpack contained two cell phones belonging to Frazier and two loaded 9mm caliber handguns.  Both guns were a ballistic match to the 9mm caliber casings recovered from the murder scene.  In addition, the BPD DNA and Serology laboratory determined that Frazier’s DNA profile matched DNA from the insides of the gloves, and the victim’s DNA profile matched DNA from the outsides of the gloves.  Frazier illegally possessed the two loaded 9mm firearms, as he was prohibited from possessing firearms or ammunition due to previous felony convictions.

Frazier faces a maximum sentence of life in prison for possession of a firearm in furtherance of drug trafficking resulting in death; a maximum of 40 years in federal prison for conspiracy to distribute 100 grams or more of heroin; a maximum of 20 years in federal prison for possession with intent to distribute heroin and fentanyl; and a maximum of 10 years in federal prison for possession of firearms by a felon.  U.S. District Judge Catherine C. Blake has scheduled sentencing for May 29, 2020, at 9:30 a.m.

On February 20, 2020, co-defendant Corloyd Anderson, a/k/a Bo, age 37, of Baltimore, was sentenced to 22 years in federal prison, followed by five years of supervised release, for conspiracy to participate in a racketeering enterprise related to his participation in the gang activities of the MMP gang.  Anderson was convicted on April 30, 2019, after a six-week trial.  The evidence showed that Anderson supplied large volumes of heroin to members of MMP for distribution in MMP’s territory in the area of Windsor Mill Road and Forest Park Avenue. There was also evidence presented that Anderson disposed of a murder weapon for MMP Boss Dontray Johnson, a/k/a “Bino,” and he illegally possessed a loaded handgun after having been convicted of at least three prior felonies.

This case is part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN), a program bringing together all levels of law enforcement and the communities they serve to reduce violent crime and make our neighborhoods safer for everyone.  Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN) is the centerpiece of the Department of Justice’s violent crime reduction efforts.  PSN is an evidence-based program proven to be effective at reducing violent crime. Through PSN, a broad spectrum of stakeholders work together to identify the most pressing violent crime problems in the community and develop comprehensive solutions to address them. As part of this strategy, PSN focuses enforcement efforts on the most violent offenders and partners with locally based prevention and reentry programs for lasting reductions in crime.

United States Attorney Robert K. Hur praised the ATF, the Baltimore City and Baltimore County Police Departments, and the Baltimore City and Baltimore County State’s Attorney’s Offices for their work in the investigation and prosecution.  Mr. Hur thanked Assistant United States Attorneys Christina Hoffman, Lauren E. Perry, and Christopher M. Rigali, who are prosecuting this Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force case.

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Baltimore, Maryland - U.S. District Judge Catherine C. Blake sentenced Dontray Johnson, a/k/a “Gambino,” “Bino,” and “Tray,” age 33, of Baltimore, Maryland, on November 27, 2018, to 30 years in federal prison, followed by five years of supervised release, for racketeering and drug conspiracies related to his participation in the gang activities of the Murdaland Mafia Piru (MMP), a subset of the Bloods gang.  As part of his gang activities, Johnson admitted committing two murders, and to conspiring to distribute controlled substances. 

The sentence was announced by United States Attorney for the District of Maryland Robert K. Hur; Special Agent in Charge Rob Cekada of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) Baltimore Field Division; Interim Commissioner Gary Tuggle of the Baltimore Police Department; Chief Terrence B. Sheridan of the Baltimore County Police Department; Baltimore City State’s Attorney Marilyn J. Mosby; and Baltimore County State’s Attorney Scott Shellenberger.

“Federal authorities worked with the Baltimore City and Baltimore County Police Departments and State’s Attorney’s Offices to dismantle a criminal organization that dealt drugs and despair in Northwest Baltimore and Baltimore County,” said U.S. Attorney Robert K. Hur.  “This sentence demonstrates that we are committed to removing from our communities the violent gang members that terrorize them.”

“Dontray Johnson supported The Murdaland Mafia Piru gang through murder, acts of violence, and by pushing drugs onto the streets of Baltimore,” said ATF Special Agent in Charge Cekada. “He and this gang willfully wreaked havoc on the community and have irreparably damaged the families of their victims. We are glad to see justice served today.

According to Johnson’s plea agreement and court documents, MMP, also known as the “Mob” or “Mobsters,” is a violent subset of the Bloods gang that operates in Maryland and elsewhere.  MMP was modeled after the Italian Mafia, and was organized hierarchically, with “the Don” at the top and various “Bosses,” “Underbosses,” “Capos,” “Lieutenants,” and “Mobsters” underneath.  For many years, MMP has controlled the drug trade in large swaths of Northwest Baltimore City and neighboring Baltimore County, including Forest Park, Windsor Mill, Gwynn Oak, Howard Park, Woodlawn, and Walbrook Junction.  The gang’s drug shop in the 5200 block of Windsor Mill Road was particularly lucrative due to its close proximity to Interstate 70, and it frequently attracted drug customers driving from Western Maryland and neighboring states.  MMP’s members enriched themselves through drug trafficking and other criminal activities, and using violence and threats of violence to intimidate or retaliate against witnesses, protect the gang’s territories, enforce debts, and eliminate rivals.

Johnson admits that he was a member of MMP and participated in the gang’s affairs through a pattern of racketeering activities, including murder, extortion, robbery, witness tampering and retaliation, money laundering, and drug distribution.

Specifically, Johnson admits that on November 22, 2012, he murdered MMP member Antoine Ellis, a/k/a Poopy, in the 200 block of North Forest Park Avenue, because he had shown disloyalty to MMP.  Earlier that day, Johnson had posted a comment to his Facebook account saying “198 n risen,” a reference to that year’s murder tally in Baltimore City.  On September 29, 2015, Johnson murdered MMP member Brian Johnson, a/k/a Nutty B, because he refused to pay gang dues that Johnson was collecting for an MMP member.

As detailed in his plea agreement, on November 1, 2013, Johnson was featured in two rap videos that were posted to a social media website.  The first video, “Boy You Lying,” was posted to enhance the gang’s status, intimidate rivals, and discourage anyone from selling drugs in MMP territory without paying its members.  The second video, “Str8 Mobbin,” was posted to assert the gang’s dominance over its drug territories.  It features Johnson with other MMP members, as well as footage of various MMP drug locations.  Johnson brandishes a firearm in the video.

On July 31, 2015, law enforcement executed a search warrant at Johnson’s residence in Owings Mills and recovered 28 grams of heroin, 70 rounds of .22-caliber ammunition, a bulletproof vest, $1,480 in cash, and an “owe sheet” with a tally of drug debts owed by MMP members and associates.

Finally, Johnson admits that he conspired with other MMP members to distribute at least one kilogram of heroin and 280 grams of crack cocaine, and that he knew that during the conspiracy between one and three kilograms of heroin and between 280 and 840 grams of crack cocaine would be distributed.

In addition to Johnson, eighteen of twenty-six defendants have pleaded guilty in the case.  Trial is scheduled for the remaining members on March 18, 2019.

This case is part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN), a program bringing together all levels of law enforcement and the communities they serve to reduce violent crime and make our neighborhoods safer for everyone.  The U.S. Department of Justice reinvigorated PSN in 2017 as part of its renewed focus on targeting violent criminals, directing all U.S. Attorney’s Offices to work in partnership with federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement and the local community to develop effective, locally based strategies to reduce violent crime.

United States Attorney Robert K. Hur praised the ATF, the Baltimore City and Baltimore County Police Departments, and the Baltimore City and Baltimore County State’s Attorney’s Offices for their work in the investigation and prosecution.  Mr. Hur thanked Assistant United States Attorneys Christina Hoffman and Lauren E. Perry, who are prosecuting the case.

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Baltimore, Maryland - Dontray Johnson, a/k/a “Gambino,” “Bino,” and “Tray,” age 33, of Baltimore, Maryland pleaded guilty today to racketeering and drug conspiracies related to their participation in the gang activities of the Murdaland Mafia Piru (MMP), a subset of the Bloods gang.  As part of his gang activities, Johnson admitted committing two murders, and to conspiracy to distribute controlled substances. 

The guilty plea was announced by United States Attorney for the District of Maryland Robert K. Hur; Special Agent in Charge Rob Cekada of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) Baltimore Field Division; Interim Commissioner Gary Tuggle of the Baltimore Police Department; Chief Terrence B. Sheridan of the Baltimore County Police Department; Baltimore City State’s Attorney Marilyn J. Mosby; and Baltimore County State’s Attorney Scott Shellenberger.

“Federal authorities worked with the Baltimore City and Baltimore County Police Departments and State’s Attorney’s Offices to dismantle a criminal organization that dealt drugs and despair in Northwest Baltimore and Baltimore County,” said U.S. Attorney Robert K. Hur.  “We are committed to using this sort of coordinated effort to bring to justice the violent gang members that terrorize our communities.”

“The Murdaland Mafia Piru and Dontray Johnson showed no concern for the Baltimore communities they flooded with murder, violence, and drugs. They irreparably damaged the families of their victims and the neighborhoods in which they operated,” said ATF Special Agent in Charge Cekada. “Today’s plea shows the importance of investigating and prosecuting these violent groups who willfully destroy communities.”

According to Johnson’s plea agreement and court documents, MMP, also known as the “Mob” or “Mobsters,” is a violent subset of the Bloods gang that operates in Maryland and elsewhere.  MMP was modeled after the Italian Mafia, and was organized hierarchically, with “the Don,” at the top and various “Bosses,” “Underbosses,” “Capos,” “Lieutenants,” and “Mobsters” underneath.  For many years, MMP has controlled the drug trade in large swaths of Northwest Baltimore City and neighboring Baltimore County, including Forest Park, Windsor Mill, Gwynn Oak, Howard Park, Woodlawn, and Walbrook Junction.  The gang’s drug shop in the 5200 block of Windsor Mill Road was particularly lucrative due to its close proximity to Interstate 70, and it frequently attracted drug customers driving from Western Maryland and neighboring states.  MMP’s members enriched themselves through drug trafficking and other criminal activities, and using violence and threats of violence to intimidate or retaliate against witnesses, protect the gang’s territories, enforce debts, and eliminate rivals.

Johnson admits that he was a member of MMP and participated in the gang’s affairs through a pattern of racketeering activities, including murder, extortion, robbery, witness tampering and retaliation, money laundering, and drug distribution.

Specifically, Johnson admits that on November 22, 2012, he murdered MMP member Antoine Ellis, a/k/a Poopy, in the 200 block of North Forest Park Avenue, because he had shown disloyalty to MMP.  Earlier that day, Johnson had posted a comment to his Facebook account saying “198 n risen,” a reference to that year’s murder tally in Baltimore City.  On September 29, 2015, Johnson murdered MMP member Brian Johnson, a/k/a Nutty B, because he refused to pay gang dues that Johnson was collecting for an MMP member.

As detailed in his plea agreement, on November 1, 2013, Johnson was featured in two rap videos that were posted to a social media website.  The first video, “Boy You Lying,” was posted to enhance the gang’s status, intimidate rivals, and discourage anyone from selling drugs in MMP territory without paying its members.  The second video, “Str8 Mobbin,” was posted to assert the gang’s dominance over its drug territories.  It features Johnson with other MMP members, as well as footage of various MMP drug locations.  Johnson brandishes a firearm in the video.

On July 31, 2015, law enforcement executed a search warrant at Johnson’s residence in Owings Mills and recovered 28 grams of heroin, 70 rounds of .22-caliber ammunition, a bulletproof vest, $1,480 in cash, and an “owe sheet” with a tally of drug debts owed by MMP members and associates.

Finally, Johnson admits that he conspired with other MMP members to distribute at least one kilogram of heroin and 280 grams of crack cocaine, and that he knew that during the conspiracy between one and three kilograms of heroin and between 280 and 840 grams of crack cocaine would be distributed.

In addition to Johnson, fourteen of twenty-six defendants have pleaded guilty in the case.  Trial is tentatively scheduled for November 5, 2018 through February 1, 2019.

Johnson and the government have agreed that if the Court accepts the plea agreement, Johnson will be sentenced to 30 years in prison.  U.S. District Judge Catherine C. Blake has scheduled sentencing for Johnson on November 16, 2018 at 10:30 a.m. 

This case is part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN), a program bringing together all levels of law enforcement and the communities they serve to reduce violent crime and make our neighborhoods safer for everyone.  Attorney General Jeff Sessions reinvigorated PSN in 2017 as part of the Department’s renewed focus on targeting violent criminals, directing all U.S. Attorney’s Offices to work in partnership with federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement and the local community to develop effective, locally based strategies to reduce violent crime.

United States Attorney Robert K. Hur praised the ATF, the Baltimore City and Baltimore County Police Departments, and the Baltimore City and Baltimore County State’s Attorney’s Offices for their work in the investigation and prosecution.  Mr. Hur thanked Assistant United States Attorneys Christina Hoffman and Lauren E. Perry, who are prosecuting the case.

March 13, 2018                                                                                    

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                               Contact ELIZABETH MORSE

www.justice.gov/usao/md                                         at (410) 209-4885      

 

Baltimore, Maryland – Takuma Tate, a/k/a “Oop,” a/k/a “Ook,” age 39, of Baltimore pleaded guilty today to conspiracy to participate in a racketeering enterprise known as Murdaland Mafia Piru (MMP) and conspiracy to distribute controlled substances. 

Tate was one of 26 alleged MMP gang members and associates charged in this case.  Thirteen of the 26 defendants indicted have pleaded guilty to their participation in the racketeering conspiracy. 

The plea was announced by Acting United States Attorney for the District of Maryland Stephen M. Schenning; Special Agent in Charge Daniel L. Board, Jr. of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives—Baltimore Field Division; Commissioner Darryl DeSousa of the Baltimore Police Department; and Chief Terrence B. Sheridan of the Baltimore County Police Department.

According to court documents, MMP, also known as the “Mob” or “Mobsters,” is a violent subset of the Bloods gang that for many years controlled the drug trade in large swaths of Northwest Baltimore City and neighboring Baltimore County.  MMP was modeled after the Italian Mafia. Members and associates of MMP operated street-level drug distribution “shops” in various locations in Baltimore City and distributed heroin, cocaine, crack cocaine, fentanyl, and marijuana, among other controlled substances. The gang’s drug shop in the 5200 block of Windsor Mill Road was particularly lucrative due to its close proximity to Interstate 70 and  frequently attracted drug customers driving from western Maryland and neighboring states. MMP members were required to pay dues to the gang consisting of a portion of the proceeds of their criminal activities, and they were subject to reprisal—and sometimes murder—for failing to do so.  Non-members who wished to sell drugs in MMP’s territories were forced to pay a “tax” or were targeted for violence by MMP members.  MMP members enhance their status within the gang by carrying out acts of violence against rivals; for instance, members can earn a “lightning bolt” tattoo for “killing for the Mob.” 

The 32-count second superseding indictment alleges that from at least 2011 through 2017, the defendants were members and associates of MMP who engaged in criminal activities in furtherance of the gang, including five murders, six attempted murders, assaults, abduction, witness tampering, and drug distribution resulting in nonfatal overdoses.  Tate admitted that he agreed with members of MMP to conduct and participate in the gang’s affairs through a pattern of racketeering activity that included offenses involving drug distribution.  He also agreed that it was reasonably foreseeable to him that between one and three kilograms of heroin and between 280 and 840 grams of cocaine base would be distributed by members of the conspiracy.

The following 13 defendants were charged in the superseding indictment unsealed on September 27, 2016, and charges remain pending against them in the second superseding indictment:

Dante Bailey, a/k/a “Gutta,” “Almighty,” and “Wolf,” age 37, of Windsor Mill, Maryland; Dontray Johnson, a/k/a “Gambino,” “Bino,” and “Tray,” age 31, of Windsor Mill; Adrian Jamal Spence, a/k/a “Spittle,” “SP,” and “AJ,” age 29, of Baltimore; Randy Banks, a/k/a “Dirt,” age 38, of Baltimore;Ayinde Deleon, a/k/a “Murda,” and “Yin,” age 31, of Baltimore; Jamal Lockley, a/k/a “T-Roy,” and “Droid,” age 37, of Baltimore; Jacob Bowling, a/k/a “Jakey,” “Ghost,” and “Fred,” age 30, of Gwynn Oak, Maryland; Corloyd Anderson, a/k/a “Bo,” age 33, of Owings Mills, Maryland; Devon Dent, a/k/a “Tech,” age 26, of Gwynn Oak; Tiffany Bailey, a/k/a “Tiff,” age 31, of Windsor Mill; Shakeen Davis, a/k/a “Creams,” age 22, of Baltimore; Sydni Frazier, a/k/a “Sid,” a/k/a “Perry,” age 26, of Baltimore; and Malcolm Lashley, a/k/a “Spook,” age 27, of Baltimore.

An indictment is not a finding of guilt.  Individuals charged by indictment is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty at some later criminal proceedings. 

In addition to Tate, the following 12 defendants have pleaded guilty to their participation in the racketeering conspiracy:

William Banks, a/k/a “Trouble,” age 27, of Baltimore; Dominick Wedlock, a/k/a “Rage,” and “Nick,” age 29, of Baltimore; Dwight Jenkins, a/k/a “Huggie,” and “Unc,” age 48, of Baltimore; Melvin Lashley, a/k/a “Menace,” age 26, of Baltimore; Maurice Pollock, a/k/a “Reese,” age 22, of Baltimore; Delante Lee, a/k/a “Tay Tay,” age 21, of Baltimore; William Jones, a/k/a “Bill,” and “Smalls,” age 27, of Baltimore; Jarmal Harrid, a/k/a “J-Rock,” and “PJ,” age 27, of Gwynn Oak; Jamal Smith, a/k/a “Mal,” and “Lil Mal,” age 25, of Gwynn Oak; Charles Blackwell, a/k/a “Ci-Bo,” and “Lil Charlie,” age 21, of Woodlawn; Kenneth Torry, a/k/a “Kenny,” age 39, of Owings Mills; Jay Greer, a/k/a “Champagne,” “Montana Gold,” and “Slick,” age 24, of Baltimore.

Tate and the government have agreed that if the Court accepts the plea agreement Tate will be sentenced to 10 years in prison followed by five years of supervised release.  U.S. District Judge Catherine C. Blake has scheduled sentencing for June 19, 2018 at 9:15a.m.

Acting United States Attorney Stephen M. Schenning commended the ATF, Baltimore City and Baltimore County Police Departments, and the Baltimore City and Baltimore County State’s Attorney’s Offices for their work in the investigation and prosecution. Mr. Schenning thanked Assistant United States Attorneys Christina A. Hoffman and Lauren E. Perry, who prosecuted the case.

Gang Members Allegedly Committed Five Murders, Six Attempted Murders, Assaults, Abduction, Witness Tampering, And Drug Distribution Resulting in Overdoses

 

Baltimore, Maryland – A federal grand jury returned a second superseding indictment on June 1, 2017, charging two additional defendants with conspiracy to participate in a racketeering enterprise known as Murdaland Mafia Piru (MMP) and conspiracy to distribute controlled substances. The indictment also adds new charges against six of the defendants charged in the previous indictment, including murder charges against the gang’s alleged leader, Dante Bailey, a/k/a Gutta, and Dontray Johnson, a/k/a Gambino.

 

One of the defendants newly charged in the case is Sydni Frazier, a/k/a “Sid,” a/k/a “Perry,” age 25, of Baltimore, Maryland. The name of the second defendant remains under seal while law enforcement officers work on bringing the defendant into custody.

 

This brings to 26 the total number of alleged MMP gang members and associates charged in the case. Ten of the 24 defendants in the previous indictment have pleaded guilty to their participation in the racketeering conspiracy. Fourteen of the 24 remain in the second superseding indictment.

 

The second superseding indictment was announced by Acting United States Attorney for the District of Maryland Stephen M. Schenning; Special Agent in Charge Daniel L. Board, Jr. of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives—Baltimore Field Division; Commissioner Kevin Davis of the Baltimore Police Department; Chief Terrence B. Sheridan of the Baltimore County Police Department; Baltimore City State’s Attorney Marilyn J. Mosby; and Baltimore County State’s Attorney Scott Shellenberger.

 

According to the indictment, MMP, also known as the “Mob” or “Mobsters,” is a violent subset of the Bloods gang that for many years controlled the drug trade in large swaths of Northwest Baltimore City and neighboring Baltimore County. MMP was modeled after the Italian Mafia. Members and associates of MMP operated street-level drug distribution “shops” in various locations in Baltimore City and distributed heroin, cocaine, crack cocaine, fentanyl, and marijuana, among other controlled substances. The gang’s drug shop in the 5200 block of Windsor Mill Road was particularly lucrative due to its close proximity to Interstate 70, and it frequently attracted drug customers driving from western Maryland and neighboring states. MMP members were required to pay dues to the gang consisting of a portion of the proceeds of their criminal activities, and they were subject to reprisal—and sometimes murder—for failing to do so. Non-members who wished to sell drugs in MMP’s territories were forced to pay a “tax” or were targeted for violence by MMP members. MMP members enhance their status within the gang by carrying out acts of violence against rivals; for instance, members can earn a “lightning bolt” tattoo for “killing for the Mob.”

 

The 32 count indictment alleges that from at least 2011 through 2017, the defendants were members and associates of MMP who engaged in criminal activities in furtherance of the gang, including five murders, six attempted murders, assaults, abduction, witness tampering, and drug distribution resulting in nonfatal overdoses.

 

For instance, the indictment alleges that on May 30, 2015, Shakeen Davis attempted to murder two victims in the gang’s territory in Northwest Baltimore by firing at least nine rounds at them with a 5.56x45mm caliber rifle. One victim suffered two graze wounds to his back, and both victims suffered cuts to their arms and hands from broken glass.

 

The indictment further alleges that on September 29, 2015, Dontray Johnson murdered an MMP member because he refused to pay gang dues Johnson was attempting to collect for Dante Bailey and his wife Tiffany Bailey. Dante Bailey approved the murder afterward in a recorded conversation, telling Johnson to continue enforcing the dues system even if it meant killing more people.

 

According to the indictment, on April 28, 2016, Dante Bailey and Jamal Lockley armed themselves and went looking to retaliate against members of a rival drug organization they believed were responsible for killing an MMP member. Bailey and Lockley drove to the rival drug organization’s territory, where they observed a victim who they suspected—wrongly—had been involved in the MMP member’s murder. Bailey shot the victim in the head, killing him. Lockley was the getaway driver.

 

The indictment further alleges that in August 2016, Dante Bailey directed the murder of a victim based on a belief that he was cooperating with law enforcement. On August 10, 2016, Sydni Frazier and one or more co-conspirators abducted, bound, and murdered the victim, and then attempted to set his body on fire. Later that day, Frazier fled from police and discarded the two murder weapons.

 

In addition, the indictment alleges that on January 8, 2017, Delante Lee attempted to murder a victim because he lingered on MMP’s drug turf after being asked to leave. Lee chased the victim into oncoming traffic, firing multiple shots at him and striking him once in the arm. Shortly afterward, Lee shot himself as he was attempting to put away the gun.

 

The two new defendants face a maximum sentence of life in prison for the racketeering conspiracy, as well as a mandatory minimum of 10 years and a maximum of life in prison for the drug conspiracy. Dante Bailey and Dontray Johnson face a mandatory minimum sentence of life in prison and the possibility of the death penalty for new charges of murder in aid of racketeering. Dante Bailey, Dontray Johnson, Corloyd Anderson, Shakeen Davis, Delante Lee, and Sydni Frazier also face new gun charges. Ayinde Deleon, Shakeen Davis, and Sydni Frazier also face new drug distribution charges.

 

An indictment is not a finding of guilt. An individual charged by indictment is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty at some later criminal proceedings.

 

The following 14 defendants were charged in the superseding indictment unsealed on September 27, 2016, and charges remain pending against them in the second superseding indictment:

Dante Bailey, a/k/a “Gutta,” “Almighty,” and “Wolf,” age 37, of Windsor Mill, Maryland;

Dontray Johnson, a/k/a “Gambino,” “Bino,” and “Tray,” age 31, of Windsor Mill;

Adrian Jamal Spence, a/k/a “Spittle,” “SP,” and “AJ,” age 29, of Baltimore;

Randy Banks, a/k/a “Dirt,” age 38, of Baltimore;

Ayinde Deleon, a/k/a “Murda,” and “Yin,” age 31, of Baltimore;

Jamal Lockley, a/k/a “T-Roy,” and “Droid,” age 37, of Baltimore;

Jacob Bowling, a/k/a “Jakey,” “Ghost,” and “Fred,” age 30, of Gwynn Oak, Maryland;

Corloyd Anderson, a/k/a “Bo,” age 33, of Owings Mills, Maryland;

Devon Dent, a/k/a “Tech,” age 26, of Gwynn Oak;

Tiffany Bailey, a/k/a “Tiff,” age 31, of Windsor Mill;

Takuma Tate, a/k/a “Oop,” and “Ook,” age 37, of Baltimore;

Maurice Pollock, a/k/a “Reese,” age 22, of Baltimore;

Shakeen Davis, a/k/a “Creams,” age 22, of Baltimore;

Delante Lee, a/k/a “Tay Tay,” age 21, of Baltimore; and

The following 10 defendants were charged in the previous indictment and have pleaded guilty to their participation in the racketeering conspiracy:

 

William Banks, a/k/a “Trouble,” age 27, of Baltimore;

Dominick Wedlock, a/k/a “Rage,” and “Nick,” age 29, of Baltimore;

Dwight Jenkins, a/k/a “Huggie,” and “Unc,” age 48, of Baltimore;

Melvin Lashley, a/k/a “Menace,” age 26, of Baltimore;

William Jones, a/k/a “Bill,” and “Smalls,” age 27, of Baltimore;

Jarmal Harrid, a/k/a “J-Rock,” and “PJ,” age 27, of Gwynn Oak;

Jamal Smith, a/k/a “Mal,” and “Lil Mal,” age 25, of Gwynn Oak;

Charles Blackwell, a/k/a “Ci-Bo,” and “Lil Charlie,” age 21, of Woodlawn, Maryland;

Kenneth Torry, a/k/a “Kenny,” age 39, of Owings Mills;

Jay Greer, a/k/a “Champagne,” “Montana Gold,” and “Slick,” age 24, of Baltimore.

Acting United States Attorney Stephen M. Schenning commended the ATF, Baltimore City and Baltimore County Police Departments, and the Baltimore City and Baltimore County State’s Attorney’s Offices for their work in the investigation and prosecution. Mr. Schenning thanked Assistant United States Attorneys Christina A. Hoffman, Lauren E. Perry, and Jason D. Medinger, who are prosecuting the case.

Description: The fiscal year of the data file obtained from the AOUSC
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Description: The four digit AO offense code associated with FTITLE1
Format: A4

Description: The four digit D2 offense code associated with FTITLE1
Format: A4

Description: A code indicating the severity associated with FTITLE1
Format: A3

Description: The FIPS code used to indicate the county or parish where an offense was committed
Format: A5

Description: The date of the last action taken on the record
Format: YYYYMMDD

Description: The date upon which judicial proceedings before the court concluded
Format: YYYYMMDD

Description: The date upon which the final sentence is recorded on the docket
Format: YYYYMMDD

Description: The date upon which the case was closed
Format: YYYYMMDD

Description: The total fine imposed at sentencing for all offenses of which the defendant was convicted and a fine was imposed
Format: N8

Description: A count of defendants filed including inter-district transfers
Format: N1

Description: A count of defendants filed excluding inter-district transfers
Format: N1

Description: A count of original proceedings commenced
Format: N1

Description: A count of defendants filed whose proceedings commenced by reopen, remand, appeal, or retrial
Format: N1

Description: A count of defendants terminated including interdistrict transfers
Format: N1

Description: A count of defendants terminated excluding interdistrict transfers
Format: N1

Description: A count of original proceedings terminated
Format: N1

Description: A count of defendants terminated whose proceedings commenced by reopen, remand, appeal, or retrial
Format: N1

Description: A count of defendants pending as of the last day of the period including long term fugitives
Format: N1

Description: A count of defendants pending as of the last day of the period excluding long term fugitives
Format: N1

Description: The source from which the data were loaded into the AOUSC’s NewSTATS database
Format: A10

Description: A sequential number indicating the iteration of the defendant record
Format: N2

Description: The date the record was loaded into the AOUSC’s NewSTATS database
Format: YYYYMMDD

Description: Statistical year ID label on data file obtained from the AOUSC which represents termination year
Format: YYYY

Data imported from FJC Integrated Database
F U C K I N G P E D O S R E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E