Score:   1
Docket Number:   D-MA  1:19-cr-10459
Case Name:   USA v. Cecchetelli et al
  Press Releases:
BOSTON – Thirteen men were indicted on Dec. 4, 2019, and charged in federal court in Boston with various drug trafficking offenses and money laundering.

The following individuals were indicted:

Yuen Liu-Torres, a/k/a “Chino,” 36, of New Bedford, was charged with conspiring to distribute and to possess with intent to distribute five kilograms or more of cocaine, and conspiracy to launder monetary instruments;

 Victor Alejandro-Carrillo, 28, of New Bedford, was charged with conspiring to distribute and to possess with intent to distribute five kilograms or more of cocaine, 100 grams or more of heroin and 40 grams or more of fentanyl;

Elvis Garcia, 37, of New Bedford, was charged with conspiring to distribute and to possess with intent to distribute 500 grams or more of cocaine;

Jose Rodriguez-Garcia, a/k/a Pina, 35, of New Bedford, was charged with conspiring to distribute and to possess with intent to distribute 500 grams or more of cocaine and conspiracy to launder monetary instruments;

Jose L. Diaz Fontanez, 45, of New Bedford, was charged with conspiring to distribute and to possess with intent to distribute 500 grams or more of cocaine and possession with intent to distribute 500 grams or more of cocaine;

Keon Green, 34, of New Bedford, was charged with conspiring to distribute and to possess with intent to distribute 500 grams or more of cocaine;

Ricardo Correa-Perez, 44, of New Bedford, was charged with conspiring to distribute and to possess with intent to distribute 500 grams or more of cocaine;

Caly Juan Montanez Agosto, a/k/a “Cali,” 38, of Puerto Rico, was charged with conspiring to distribute and to possess with intent to distribute 500 grams or more of cocaine;

Manuel Colon, 48, of New Bedford, was charged with conspiring to distribute and to possess with intent to distribute 500 grams or more of cocaine, 100 grams or more of heroin and 50 grams or more of fentanyl;

Jaime Torres, 45, of Fall River, was charged with conspiring to distribute and to possess with intent to distribute 500 grams or more of cocaine, and possession with intent to distribute 100 grams or more of heroin, 500 grams or more of cocaine, 40 grams or more of fentanyl and 5 grams or more of methamphetamine;

Ricardo Torres, a/k/a “Louis Torres,” a/k/a “Angel Manzano,” a/k/a “Richie,” 46, of Chicopee, was charged with conspiring to distribute and to possess with intent to distribute 500 grams or more of cocaine;

Alexander Santiago Medina, a/k/a “Flaco,” 32, of Fall River, was charged with conspiring to distribute and to possess with intent to distribute 500 grams or more of cocaine; and

Vicente Gonzalez, a/k/a/ “Viejo,” 46, was charged with conspiring to distribute and to possess with intent to distribute 500 grams or more of cocaine  and possession with intent to distribute 500 grams or more of cocaine.

The charge of conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute and possession with intent to distribute five kilograms or more of cocaine provides for a sentence of at least 10 years and up to life in prison, five years of supervised release and a fine of up to $10 million. The charge of conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute 500 grams or more of cocaine, 100 grams or more of heroin, and 40 grams or more of fentanyl, as well as the charge of possession with intent to distribute 500 grams or more of cocaine, 100 grams or more of heroin, 40 grams or more of fentanyl, and five grams or more of methamphetamine, each provide for a sentence of at least five years and up to 40 years in prison, four years of supervised release and a fine of up to $5 million. The charge of conspiracy to launder monetary instruments provides for a sentence of up to 20 years in prison, three years of supervised release and a fine of up to $500,000. Sentences are imposed by a federal district court judge based upon the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines and other statutory factors.

United States Attorney Andrew E. Lelling; Brian D. Boyle, Special Agent in Charge of the Drug Enforcement Administration, New England Field Division; Joseph Cronin, Inspector in Charge of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service, Boston Division; and New Bedford Police Chief Joseph C. Cordeiro made the announcement. Assistant U.S. Attorney Craig Estes of Lelling’s Narcotics and Money Laundering Unit is prosecuting the case.   

The operation was conducted by a multi-agency task force through the Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force (OCDETF), a partnership between federal, state and local law enforcement agencies. The principal mission of the OCDETF program is to identify, disrupt and dismantle the most serious drug trafficking, weapons trafficking and money laundering organizations, and those primarily responsible for the nation’s illegal drug supply. More information on the OCDETF program is available here: https://www.justice.gov/ocdetf/about-ocdetf.

BOSTON – The East Coast and Massachusetts leadership of the Almighty Latin Kings and Queen Nation (Latin Kings), including more than 60 members and associates, face federal charges. 

This morning, over 500 federal, state and local law enforcement officers arrested dozens of Latin Kings members and associates and executed 31 search warrants at 24 locations. 

According to court documents, the Eastern Region of the Latin Kings encompasses local chapters in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and various other states along the eastern seaboard from Maryland to Florida. There are 11 active Latin Kings Chapters operating in Massachusetts: D5K (Boston), Morton Street Bricks (Boston), New Bedford, Springfield, Lynn/Salem, Chelsea, Lowell, Lawrence, Worcester, Fitchburg and within the Department of Corrections.

Criminal activity in the Eastern Region is led by Michael Cecchetelli, a/k/a “King Merlin, 40, of Springfield, who holds the title of Supreme East Coast Regional Overseer. Cecchetelli is alleged to be the conduit between each of the Eastern Region states and the Latin Kings national leadership in Chicago. He developed a leadership approach to the gang which has become a model for other Latin Kings regions of the country. 

The Latin Kings adhere to a national manifesto, employ an internal judiciary, and use a sophisticated system of communication to maintain the hierarchy of the criminal organization. As alleged in court documents, the gang uses drug distribution to generate revenue, and is motivated by a desire to further its influence and to protect its turf from rival gangs. This has fostered a culture of institutional violence and secrecy.

During the four-year investigation, law enforcement developed evidence that the Latin Kings trafficked drugs, conspired to murder more than 10 victims, and committed violent crimes including numerous incidents of robbery, shootings, stabbings and witness intimidation.

The RICO conspiracy charge provides a sentence of up to 20 years in prison, three years of supervised release and a fine of $250,000. Depending on the drug quantity, the drug trafficking conspiracy and distribution charges provide for a sentence of up to 20 years, 40 years, or life, a minimum of three, four or five years of supervised release and fines of $1 million, $5 million and $10 million. The charge of felon in possession of a firearm and ammunition provides a sentence of up to 10 years, three years of supervised release and a fine of $250,000. Sentences are imposed by a federal district court judge based upon the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines and other statutory factors.

United States Attorney Andrew E. Lelling; Joseph R. Bonavolonta, Special Agent in Charge of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Boston Field Division; and Commissioner Carol Mici of the Massachusetts Department of Correction made the announcement today. Valuable assistance was also provided by the FBI North Shore Gang Task Force, Bristol County and Suffolk County District Attorney’s Offices.

Assistant U.S. Attorneys Emily Cannon and Philip Mallard of Lelling’s Organized Crime and Gang Unit are prosecuting the cases.

The details contained in the charging documents are allegations. The defendants are presumed to be innocent unless and until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.

###

 

Addendum

 

            The following defendants have been charged:

 



 





Defendant





Role





1





Michael Cecchetelli, King Merlin

 





East Coast Team,

East Coast Overseer 





2





Esther Ortiz, Queen India

Meriden, CT





East Coast Team,

East Coast Crown Council Chairwoman





3





Hector Manuel Vega, King Demon

Britian, CT





East Coast Team,

Crown Council Member, CT





4





Jorge Rodriguez, King G





State Team, Cacique

Enforcer (Former)





5





Michael Marrero, King Clumsy





State Team, Enforcer

Regional Officer (Former)





6





Francisco Lopez, King Cisco

Chelsea, Mass.





State Team, Treasurer/Secretary





7





Gregory Peguero-Colon, King Trece

Springfield, Mass.





State Team,

Crown Council Chairman





8





Juan Liberato, King Prodigy

Haverhill, Mass.





State Team, Inca (Former)





9





Angel Roldan, King Big-A and Nelty

Lowell, Mass.





State Team, Cacique (Former)

Enforcer (Former)





10





Frutuoso Barros, King Fruity





DOC, Supreme Regional Officer





11





Sandra Correa, Queen Dream

Peabody, Mass.





DOC, Secretary (Former)





12





Shaun Harrison Rev





DOC, Member





13





Vincent Dzierwinski, King Vice





DOC, Member





14





Wilson Peguero, King Dubb

Dorchester, Mass.





D5K, Inca





15





Alexis Peguero, King Lexi/Looney

Dorchester, Mass.





D5K, Cacique





16





Matthew Palacios, King Nene





D5K, Enforcer





17





Steven Familia-Valdez, King Haze

Mattapan, Mass.





D5K, Member





18





Dante Lara, King Nasty

Providence, RI





D5K, Member





19





Robert Lara,  King Rizz

Chelsea, Mass.





D5K, Member





20





Angel Abymael Ortiz, King Abby

Randolph, Mass.





D5K, Member





21





Angel Rodriguez, King Ace

Dorchester, Mass.





D5K, Member

Crown Council Chairman for Boston





22





Alexis Velasquez, King Booboo

Dorchester, Mass.





MSB, Inca





23





Angel Calderon, King Bam





MSB,

(Former) State Team Head of Security





24





Oscar Pena, King O-Block





D5K, Member





25





Jose Rodriguez, King Stutter

New Bedford, Mass.





New Bedford, Inca





26





Orlando Santiago-Torres, King Landi





New Bedford, Cacique





27





Robert Avitabile a/k/a Bobby





New Bedford, Associate





28





Taliyah Barboza, Queen Taliyah

New Bedford, Mass.





New Bedford, Member





29





Josue Carrasquillo, King Playboy

Springfield, Mass.





New Bedford, Member





30





Michael Cotto, King Gordo

New Bedford, Mass.





New Bedford, (Former) Regional Officer





31





Juan Figueroa, King Pun

Dorchester, Mass.





New Bedford, Member





32





Issac Felix-Rivera, King Izzy





New Bedford, Member





33





Kevin Guadalupe, King Milly

New Bedford, Mass.





New Bedford, Member





34





Shelton Johnson, King Shells

New Bedford, Mass.





New Bedford, Member





35





Tyson Jorge, King Music





New Bedford, Member





36





Emanuel Lopez-Velez, King Manny





New Bedford, Probationary Member





37





Luis Mendez, King Primo





New Bedford, Member, Incarcerated





38





Raekwan Paris, King D-Bo





New Bedford, Member





39





Jayco Reyes-Smith, King Javy





Former New Bedford Member, now in North Carolina





40





Luis Santiago, King Tiny





New Bedford, Member, Incarcerated





41





Roberto Vargas, King Royalty





New Bedford, Member





42





Jose Vasquez, King Fearless





New Bedford, Member





43





Natanel Velazquez, King Nael

New Bedford, Mass.





New Bedford, Member





44





Israel Rodriguez, King Imperial

Lynn, Mass.





North Shore, Inca





45





Alfred Nieves, King Alfy

Lowell, Mass.





Lowell, Inca





46





Marlon Rivera, King Pluto





Fitchburg, Member

D5K, Founder





47





Ines Lugo, Queen China

New Bedford, Mass.





New Bedford, Secretary





48





Jeremia Medina, King Sweepy

New Bedford, Mass.





New Bedford, Enforcer





49





Bienvenido Nunez, King Apache

Enfield, CT





State Team, Inca





50





Tanairy Ruiz, Queen Tanairy

New Bedford, Mass.





New Bedford, Member





51





Xavier Valentin-Soto, King X





New Bedford, Member

(Former) Cascique, Incarcerated





52





Joel Francisco, King Casper





Rhode Island, Member





53





Eric Thomas, King E





Rhode Island, Inca

 





54





Alvin Mojica, King Humble





Worcester, Inca





55





Sophia Velasquez, Queen Sophia





Fitchburg, Member





 

56





Dairon Rivera, King Mafia





Fitchburg, Member





57





Hector Adorno, King Gordo





Springfield, Member





58





Jesus Diaz, King Kiko





N. Shore, Member





59





Henry Caribe, King 40cal





N. Shore, Member





60





Jonathan Cassiano, King Legend





Springfield, Member





61





Antoine Goodson





Associate, gun supplier to gang





62





Derek Southworth





Associate, gun supplier to gang



 

 

BOSTON – An MS-13 leader was sentenced today in federal court in Boston for racketeering conspiracy.

Jose Vasquez, a/k/a “Little Crazy,” 24, of Somerville, was sentenced to 212 months in federal prison and three years of supervised release. In May 2018, Vasquez pleaded guilty to conspiracy to conduct enterprise affairs through a pattern of racketeering activity, more commonly referred to as RICO or racketeering conspiracy.

Vasquez was a member and local leader of the Trece Locos Salvatrucha, or TLS, clique of MS-13. In addition to being a leader of an MS-13 clique, Vasquez personally participated in racketeering activity and acts of violence on behalf of MS-13. Among other things, on Sept. 8, 2014, Vasquez and another MS-13 member, Angel Pineda, a/k/a “Bravo,” were involved in an attempted murder of a 16-year-old suspected gang rival. During the incident, which occurred on a public street in Chelsea in the middle of the afternoon, Pineda stabbed the victim multiple times. Vasquez, carrying a machete, also attempted to stab and kill the victim, but Vasquez’s machete got stuck in its sheath. The victim survived after receiving life-saving medical care.

In a separate incident, Vasquez assisted other MS-13 members in burying evidence relating to a murder in East Boston in January 2016. On Jan. 10, 2016, MS-13 members Edwin Gonzalez, a/k/a “Sangriento,” Edwin Diaz, a/k/a “Demente,” Jairo Perez, a/k/a “Seco,” and Rigoberto Mejia, a/k/a “Ninja,” murdered a 16-year-old boy who the gang also believed was a rival gang member. Gonzalez, Diaz, and Perez stabbed the victim multiple times while Mejia shot the victim multiple times. This incident occurred on a public street in East Boston and the victim died on the scene. A few days after the boy’s death, Vasquez—who did not participate in the murder—helped Perez bury the knives used in the killing, as well as the bloody clothes worn by those who committed the murder. The evidence was later recovered by law enforcement. 

After a multi-year investigation, Vasquez was one of dozens of leaders, members, and associates of MS-13 named in a superseding indictment unsealed in January 2016 that targeted MS-13’s criminal activities in Massachusetts. According to court documents, MS-13 members in Massachusetts engaged in a variety of racketeering acts and crimes of violence, including six different murders between October 2014 and January 2016. 

Vasquez is one of 49 defendants who have been convicted as part of this ongoing prosecution, and 16 of those defendants have been held responsible for murder. 40 of the 49 convictions, including Vasquez, were the result of guilty pleas prior to trial. Nine other defendants were convicted after trial. 

All the defendants involved in the attempted murder or murder that Vasquez assisted with have been convicted. Diaz, who participated in the murder, was sentenced to 35 years in prison, and Pineda, who participated in the attempted murder, was sentenced to 93 months in prison.  Gonzalez, Perez, and Mejia await sentencing. 

United States Attorney Andrew E. Lelling; Harold H. Shaw, Special Agent in Charge of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Boston Field Division; Peter C. Fitzhugh, Special Agent in Charge of Homeland Security Investigations in Boston; Colonel Kerry A. Gilpin, Superintendent of the Massachusetts State Police; Commissioner Thomas Turco of the Massachusetts Department of Corrections; Essex County Sheriff Kevin F. Coppinger; Suffolk County Sheriff Steven W. Thompkins; Suffolk County District Attorney Daniel F. Conley; Middlesex County District Attorney Marian T. Ryan; Essex County District Attorney Jonathan Blodgett; Boston Police Commissioner William Gross; Chelsea Police Chief Brian A. Kyes; Everett Police Chief Steven A. Mazzie; Lynn Police Chief Michael Mageary; Revere Police Chief James Guido; and Somerville Police Chief David Fallon made the announcement today.

BOSTON – An MS-13 member pleaded guilty today in federal court in Boston to racketeering conspiracy.

Jose Vasquez, a/k/a “Little Crazy,” 24, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to conduct enterprise affairs through a pattern of racketeering activity, more commonly referred to as RICO or racketeering conspiracy. U.S. District Court Judge F. Dennis Saylor IV scheduled sentencing for Aug. 30, 2018.

Vasquez was a member and local leader of the Trece Locos Salvatrucha or TLS clique of MS-13. Vasquez personally participated in racketeering activity on behalf of MS-13. Among other things, on Sept. 8, 2014, Vasquez and another MS-13 member, Angel Pineda a/k/a “Bravo,” were involved in an attempted murder of a suspected gang rival in which the victim was stabbed multiple times.

Separately, Vasquez assisted other MS-13 members in burying evidence relating to a murder in East Boston in January 2016.  On Jan. 10, 2016, Edwin Diaz, a/k/a “Demente,” Rigoberto Mejia, a/k/a “Ninja,” and other MS-13 members murdered a 16-year-old boy who MS-13 members believed to belong to the rival 18th Street gang. The victim was shot and stabbed multiple times. A few days after the murder, Vasquez—who did not personally commit the murder—helped another MS-13 member hide evidence related to the murder.  Specifically, Vasquez helped bury the knife and machete used in the murder, as well as bloody clothes worn by those who committed the crime. This evidence was later recovered by law enforcement.  

After a multi-year investigation, Vasquez was one of dozens of alleged leaders, members, and associates of MS-13 named in a superseding indictment unsealed in January 2016 that targeted MS-13’s criminal activities in Massachusetts. Vasquez is the 46th defendant to be convicted as part of that ongoing prosecution.

Pineda previously pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 93 months in prison. Diaz and Mejia previously pleaded guilty to racketeering conspiracy involving murder and are awaiting sentencing.

At today’s hearing, the Court accepted Vasquez’s guilty plea but deferred acceptance of the proposed plea agreement until the sentencing hearing. Under the terms of the proposed plea agreement, Vasquez will be sentenced to between 15 and 18 years in prison. 

United States Attorney Andrew E. Lelling; Harold H. Shaw, Special Agent in Charge of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Boston Field Division; Peter Fitzhugh, Special Agent in Charge of Homeland Security Investigations in Boston; Colonel Kerry A. Gilpin, Superintendent of the Massachusetts State Police; Commissioner Thomas Turco of the Massachusetts Department of Corrections; Essex County Sheriff Kevin F. Coppinger; Suffolk County Sheriff Steven W. Thompkins; Suffolk County District Attorney Daniel F. Conley; Middlesex County District Attorney Marian T. Ryan; Essex County District Attorney Jonathan Blodgett; Boston Police Commissioner William Evans; Chelsea Police Chief Brian A. Kyes; Everett Police Chief Steven A. Mazzie; Lynn Police Chief Michael Mageary; Revere Police Chief James Guido; and Somerville Police Chief David Fallon made the announcement.

The remaining defendants charged in this case are presumed to be innocent unless and until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.

BOSTON – A member of MS-13’s Enfermos Criminales Salvatrucha clique in Chelsea was sentenced today in federal court in Boston for RICO conspiracy involving the attempted murder of a rival gang member.

 

Angel Pineda, a/k/a “Bravo,” 21, a Honduran national who resided in Revere, was sentenced by U.S. District Court Judge F. Dennis Saylor IV to 93 months in prison and will be subject to deportation after completion of his sentence. In April 2017, Pineda pleaded guilty to conspiracy to conduct enterprise affairs through a pattern of racketeering activity, more commonly referred to as RICO conspiracy. He also admitted responsibility for an attempted murder of a rival gang member.

 

Pineda was a member of the Enfermos Criminales Salvatrucha clique in Chelsea. On Sept. 8, 2014, Pineda and another MS-13 member, Jose Vasquez, a/k/a “Little Crazy,” attempted to murder an 18th Street gang member by stabbing him in Chelsea.

 

After a three-year investigation, Pineda was one of 61 defendants named in a January 2016 superseding indictment targeting the criminal activities of alleged leaders, members, and associates of MS-13 in Massachusetts. According to court documents, MS-13 is a violent transnational criminal organization whose branches or “cliques” operate throughout the United States, including Massachusetts. MS-13 members are required to commit acts of violence against rival gang members to gain promotions and to maintain membership and discipline within the group. Specifically, MS-13 members are required to attack and murder rival gang members whenever possible.

 

Acting United States Attorney William D. Weinreb; Harold H. Shaw, Special Agent in Charge of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Boston Field Division; Matthew Etre, Special Agent in Charge of Homeland Security Investigations in Boston; Colonel Richard D. McKeon, Superintendent of the Massachusetts State Police; Commissioner Thomas Truco of the Massachusetts Department of Corrections; Essex County Sheriff Kevin F. Coppinger; Suffolk County Sheriff Steven W. Thompkins; Suffolk County District Attorney Daniel F. Conley; Middlesex County District Attorney Marian T. Ryan; Essex County District Attorney Jonathan Blodgett; Boston Police Commissioner William Evans; Chelsea Police Chief Brian A. Kyes; Everett Police Chief Steven A. Mazzie; Lynn Police Chief Michael Mageary; Revere Police Chief Joseph Cafarelli; and Somerville Police Chief David Fallon made the announcement.

The details contained in the charging documents are allegations. The remaining defendants are presumed to be innocent unless and until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.

 

BOSTON – A member of MS-13’s Enfermos Criminales Salvatrucha clique in Chelsea, Mass., pleaded guilty today in federal court in Boston to RICO conspiracy involving the attempted murder of a rival gang member.

 

Angel Pineda, a/k/a “Bravo,” 21, a Honduran national who resided in Revere, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to conduct enterprise affairs through a pattern of racketeering activity, more commonly referred to as RICO conspiracy, and admitted responsibility for the attempted murder of a rival 18th Street gang member in Chelsea in September 2014. U.S. District Court Judge F. Dennis Saylor IV Judge deferred accepting the defendant’s plea agreement until sentencing, and scheduled sentencing for July 26, 2017. If the court accepts the plea agreement, Pineda will be sentenced to 10 years in prison and will be subject to deportation after completion of his sentence.

 

After a three-year investigation, Pineda was one of 61 defendants named in a January 2016 superseding indictment targeting the criminal activities of alleged leaders, members, and associates of MS-13 in Massachusetts. According to court documents, MS-13 is a violent transnational criminal organization whose branches or “cliques” operate throughout the United States, including Massachusetts. MS-13 members are required to commit acts of violence against rival gang members to gain promotions and to maintain membership and discipline within the group. Specifically, MS-13 members are required to attack and murder rival gang members whenever possible. Pineda was a member of the Enfermos Criminales Salvatrucha clique in Chelsea. In furtherance of the MS-13 RICO conspiracy, on Sept. 8, 2014, Pineda and another MS-13 member, Jose Vasquez, a/k/a “Little Crazy,” attempted to murder a rival 18th Street gang member by stabbing him in Chelsea.

 

The RICO conspiracy charge provides for a sentence of no greater than 20 years in prison, three years of supervised release, and a fine of $250,000. Actual sentences for federal crimes are typically less than the maximum penalties. Sentences are imposed by a federal district court judge based upon the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines and other statutory factors.

 

Pineda is the fourteenth defendant to plead guilty in this case.

 

Acting United States Attorney William D. Weinreb; Harold H. Shaw, Special Agent in Charge of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Boston Field Division; Matthew Etre, Special Agent in Charge of Homeland Security Investigations in Boston; Colonel Richard D. McKeon, Superintendent of the Massachusetts State Police; Commissioner Thomas Truco of the Massachusetts Department of Corrections; Essex County Sheriff Kevin F. Coppinger; Suffolk County Sheriff Steven W. Thompkins; Suffolk County District Attorney Daniel F. Conley; Middlesex County District Attorney Marian T. Ryan; Essex County District Attorney Jonathan Blodgett; Boston Police Commissioner William Evans; Chelsea Police Chief Brian A. Kyes; Everett Police Chief Steven A. Mazzie; Lynn Police Chief Michael Mageary; Revere Police Chief Joseph Cafarelli; and Somerville Police Chief David Fallon, made the announcement.

 

The details contained in the charging documents are allegations. The remaining defendants are presumed to be innocent unless and until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.

 

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https://www.courtlistener.com/docket/16548939/united-states-v-cecchetelli/
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https://www.courtlistener.com/docket/16548941/united-states-v-cecchetelli/
https://www.courtlistener.com/docket/16548942/united-states-v-cecchetelli/
https://www.courtlistener.com/docket/16548943/united-states-v-cecchetelli/
https://www.courtlistener.com/docket/16548944/united-states-v-cecchetelli/
https://www.courtlistener.com/docket/16548945/united-states-v-cecchetelli/
https://www.courtlistener.com/docket/16548946/united-states-v-cecchetelli/
https://www.courtlistener.com/docket/16548947/united-states-v-cecchetelli/
https://www.courtlistener.com/docket/16548948/united-states-v-cecchetelli/
https://www.courtlistener.com/docket/16548949/united-states-v-cecchetelli/
https://www.courtlistener.com/docket/16549146/united-states-v-cecchetelli/
Docket (0 Docs):   https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1YEZsYdJyp1Fwz2Acz9asDxiMeBdZlAJsXdP7y-R-f80/edit#gid=0
  Last Updated: 2020-11-05 09:34:04 UTC
Description: The fiscal year of the data file obtained from the AOUSC
Format: YYYY

Description: The code of the federal judicial circuit where the case was located
Format: A2

Description: The code of the federal judicial district where the case was located
Format: A2

Description: The code of the district office where the case was located
Format: A2

Description: Docket number assigned by the district to the case
Format: A7

Description: A unique number assigned to each defendant in a case which cannot be modified by the court
Format: A3

Description: A unique number assigned to each defendant in a case which can be modified by the court
Format: A3

Description: A sequential number indicating whether a case is an original proceeding or a reopen
Format: N5

Description: Case type associated with the current defendant record
Format: A2

Description: A concatenation of district, office, docket number, case type, defendant number, and reopen sequence number
Format: A18

Description: A concatenation of district, office, docket number, case type, and reopen sequence number
Format: A15

Description: The status of the defendant as assigned by the AOUSC
Format: A2

Description: A code indicating the fugitive status of a defendant
Format: A1

Description: The date upon which a defendant became a fugitive
Format: YYYYMMDD

Description: The date upon which a fugitive defendant was taken into custody
Format: YYYYMMDD

Description: The date when a case was first docketed in the district court
Format: YYYYMMDD

Description: The date upon which proceedings in a case commenced on charges pending in the district court where the defendant appeared, or the date of the defendant’s felony-waiver of indictment
Format: YYYYMMDD

Description: A code used to identify the nature of the proceeding
Format: N2

Description: The date when a defendant first appeared before a judicial officer in the district court where a charge was pending
Format: YYYYMMDD

Description: A code indicating the type of legal counsel assigned to a defendant
Format: N2

Description: The title and section of the U.S. Code applicable to the offense committed which carried the highest severity
Format: A20

Description: A code indicating the level of offense associated with FTITLE1
Format: N2

Description: The four digit AO offense code associated with FTITLE1
Format: A4

Description: The four digit D2 offense code associated with FTITLE1
Format: A4

Description: A code indicating the severity associated with FTITLE1
Format: A3

Description: The FIPS code used to indicate the county or parish where an offense was committed
Format: A5

Description: The date of the last action taken on the record
Format: YYYYMMDD

Description: The date upon which judicial proceedings before the court concluded
Format: YYYYMMDD

Description: The date upon which the final sentence is recorded on the docket
Format: YYYYMMDD

Description: The date upon which the case was closed
Format: YYYYMMDD

Description: The total fine imposed at sentencing for all offenses of which the defendant was convicted and a fine was imposed
Format: N8

Description: A count of defendants filed including inter-district transfers
Format: N1

Description: A count of defendants filed excluding inter-district transfers
Format: N1

Description: A count of original proceedings commenced
Format: N1

Description: A count of defendants filed whose proceedings commenced by reopen, remand, appeal, or retrial
Format: N1

Description: A count of defendants terminated including interdistrict transfers
Format: N1

Description: A count of defendants terminated excluding interdistrict transfers
Format: N1

Description: A count of original proceedings terminated
Format: N1

Description: A count of defendants terminated whose proceedings commenced by reopen, remand, appeal, or retrial
Format: N1

Description: A count of defendants pending as of the last day of the period including long term fugitives
Format: N1

Description: A count of defendants pending as of the last day of the period excluding long term fugitives
Format: N1

Description: The source from which the data were loaded into the AOUSC’s NewSTATS database
Format: A10

Description: A sequential number indicating the iteration of the defendant record
Format: N2

Description: The date the record was loaded into the AOUSC’s NewSTATS database
Format: YYYYMMDD

Description: Statistical year ID label on data file obtained from the AOUSC which represents termination year
Format: YYYY

Data imported from FJC Integrated Database
F U C K I N G P E D O S R E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E